Politics

Government pitches foreign influence registry, new powers for CSIS in attempt to curb foreign interference

Politics

The federal government unveiled a long-anticipated bill Monday aimed at curbing foreign interference in Canadian political life — from school boards to the House of Commons.

Bill lands just days after inquiry warned foreign interference was undermining public trust in elections

Pedestrians talk on their cellphones in Lima, Peru, on Monday, Aug. 1, 2016. Under a July 2015 decree, police now track cellphone locations without a court order but would need one to listen in. All four Peruvian phone companies are cooperating. They signed a pact with the government in Octoboer the details of which were not disclosed.
Bill C-70 introduces new foreign interference offences. (Martin Mejia/The Associated Press)

The federal government unveiled a long-anticipated bill Monday aimed at curbing foreign interference in Canadian political life — from school boards to the House of Commons.

If passed, the bill would introduce new foreign interference offence, shake up how Canada’s spy agency collects and shares intelligence and launch a long-anticipated foreign influence transparency registry.

Public Safety Minister Dominic LeBlanc tabled Bill C-70 just days after a public inquiry said attempts by other countries to meddle in Canada’s past two federal elections undermined Canadians’ trust in democracy.

The bill would make it an indictable offence under the Security of Information Act  

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